Wild Mushroom Risotto

Risotto is epic. Think of it as a canvass to unleash your culinary creativity, since it is the perfect vehicle to carry an inspiring flavour to the plate! Follow the formulaic process for creating the risotto base, and then finish it with literally countless variations of accenting flavours. The basic recipe for risotto is astoundingly simple, and the key to a perfect risotto is all in the technique:

Saute onions with olive oil, then add rice and continue. Add hot stock, one ladle at a time while stirring the risotto to massage out the starch from the grains. Finish with butter and parmesan.

The perfect risotto should have an individual bite to each grain, not an overcooked rice-pudding like texture. It should also be freely flowing, and not overly stiff. This is one of the most common crimes against risotto. Let me say this, if your risotto sticks to the underside of an upside down spoon, it is too stiff! A proper risotto will slowly ooze, like a slow flow of lava!

Mushroom risotto is a classic dish for the fall. Mushroom stock can be created by soaking dried mushrooms, with porcini carrying the most prominent umami flavour for the base. The re-constituted mushrooms can then be added back into the risotto for flavour and texture. I like to finish the risotto with an assortment of whatever fresh mushrooms I can get my hands on, sautéed to bring out their earthy flavour.

Ingredients:

1 cup Arborio or Carnaroli rice

2 cups chicken, vegetable, or mushroom stock

10g dried porcini mushrooms

0.5 cup hot water

2 cups of mixed wild mushrooms, I used 1 cup of fresh shiitake and 1 cup of frozen chanterelles

1 small yellow onion, minced

1 clove garlic, thinly sliced

0.5 cup white wine or dry vermouth

Sprig of fresh thyme and sage, stems discarded and leaves chopped

0.5 cup fresh chives

Juice of half a lemon

2 tbsp butter

1 cup shredded parmesan, or other firm cheese

About 4 tbsp olive oil, enough for several “glugs” throughout the process

Salt and pepper to taste

IMG_3261

Directions:

  1. Re-constitute the dried porcini mushrooms by adding them to a bowl with the hot water. Let sit for about 15 minutes, then remove and roughly chop the mushrooms and reserve the liquid. In the meantime, add the stock to a saucepan and maintain at a simmer.
  2. If using frozen mushrooms, sauté in a spaced out layer over medium heat to remove the moisture. You can just let them sit if they are well spaced enough, until they are slightly browned and much more dry. Remove from pan and set aside for later use.
  3. Saute the fresh mushrooms over high heat with a glug of oil. Make sure to develop some good colour on the mushrooms. Remove from pan and set aside for later use.
  4. Reduce pan to medium high heat, add another glug of oil, then add the onions and garlic. Saute until onions just begin to brown, then add the rice and another glug of oil. Stir the rice and onion mixture continuously to coat all of the rice grains with a bit of oil. The idea is to toast the rice slightly before beginning to add the liquid. Just as the first rice grains begin to turn opaque, add the wine along with the sage and thyme, as well as the porcini mushrooms with their liquid and stir vigorously.
  5. After the rice absorbs about half of the wine, add a ladle full of hot stock and continue to stir. Don’t allow the risotto to become too dry throughout this process, as it will damage the individual grains and the consistency. The stirring should always be easy and the risotto flow back and forth in a wavelike motion if the pan is shaken. Continue to repeat this process one ladle of stock at a time until finished. The constant stirring is critical, as it massages out the starch of the rice grains and gives the risotto its characteristic creamy consistency. Don’t be alarmed if the rice has a slight bite to it after the stock is used up, as risotto should have this texture.
  6. Remove pan from heat once the risotto is done cooking, then add the sautéed mushrooms, butter, cheese, chives, lemon juice, and salt and pepper.
  7. Secret step: add 2 tbsp of good olive oil to the finished risotto, then gently fold ingredients together. This is the critical step for developing a lovely, oozing risotto.

Enjoy!

IMG_3266

5 thoughts on “Wild Mushroom Risotto

  1. No saffron? Heinous. Add the saffron to the wine. Saffron contains both water soluble and alcohol soluble components, so allow it to infuse the wine for 5-10 min. And warm the wine; never add cold fluid to the rice, as it will congeal the starches. Yes, this includes at the beginning right after the rice has been toasted. I prefer to add a bit of hot stock first, let that absorb, then add the saffron infused hot wine in the next ladle.

    Like

  2. No saffron on hand, but if I did I would surely make Risotto Milanese! That’s what I call simple perfection. Do you always add saffron to your risottos?

    Come to think of it, I’ve never considered warming the wine at all! I always follow the rule when adding stock, but completely overlook it at the wine stage. Thanks for pointing that out, I’ll have to try that change to the process next time.

    Like

  3. Heinous?!?!? If I wanted a traditional recipe, I’d be reading a traditional european cuisine website! Your intuition is dead on, as usual. Here at home it’s the season of the mushroom harvest, and you, as a champion of expansive and exploratory local cuisine have hit the nail on the head — the time to restock your pantry with saffron is when mushroom season is over! Of course, the risotto has to be perfect, but as you say — it’s the canvas — and best to start with a blank canvas!

    Like

    1. Haha! Thank you Peter! I’m glad to see you as passionate about mushrooms as I am! Let’s not forget about price here too, the chanterelles in this recipe were plucked from the wild by a friend! If I was to put Saffron in every risotto, I’d half to be an oilfield executive to afford it! 😉

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s